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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Albuquerque earns berth in “sweet sixteen” for solar power

Albuquerque has more solar panels than most major American cities, ranking 12th among major metropolitan areas analyzed in a new report. The Duke City’s berth in the “solar sweet sixteen,” just behind San Francisco and ahead of Sacramento, was owed primarily to individuals installing solar panels on their homes.

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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Report: violators of Pennsylvania fracking rules operate in New Mexico

WPX Energy was among the top fracking violators examined in a new report, breaking health and environmental rules in nearly half the wells it drilled in Pennsylvania. WPX Energy is one of the top gas producers in New Mexico.

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Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Fracking Failures

Fracking is dirty. From the very beginning of clearing a site for drilling, through extraction, transport and delivery of finished products, fracking poses significant risks to our air and water and to human health. People who live and work near fracking sites are at greater risk for respiratory and neurological diseases.

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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Wind energy could reduce pollution by three coal plants

The carbon pollution from more than three coal plants could be eliminated in New Mexico if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center. The analysis comes just as Congress considers whether to renew tax credits critical to wind development.

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Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

American wind power already produced enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes. Continued, rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan.

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